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     Insights, News & Perspectives from Aspire Ascend

    • 04/10/2017 12:23 PM | Jan Molino (Administrator)


      The “Mad Men” era is still with us!

      Put your hand up if you have been subjected to sexism in the workplace.  Yes we all have in one form or another, but most women don’t even recognize it.  Take, for example, the latest female chief executive who was blamed when things went wrong at the company (think Marissa Mayer) and was promptly replaced by a male who was paid twice as much as her.  Was that just a poor performing CEO being replaced or really sexism? 

      When you think of workplace sexism, what does it look like? Is it a male executive who expects more from his female staff and is constantly moving the goal post?  While that certainly is an example of sexism and one we may believe has long since died off, far more insidious forms of sexism are alive and well in the American workplace. 

      They come into play when women, particularly those highly-capable women headed for the c-suite, exhibit what used to be considered male attributes, such as competence, assertiveness, decisiveness, rationality, and objectivity.  

      Not so long ago, overt gender bias was a perfectly acceptable office practice. (Think every single episode of Mad Men.) That sort of in-your-face sexism is not as prevalent in today’s work environment.   But remember it was driven away by fear of lawsuits, not good business practice.  Today we are given the false impression it no longer exists.  

      I remember early in my professional life having to justify why I should even interview for a leadership role over my male counterparts.  As I moved up the career ladder, it became apparent that there were two sets of rules; one for men, another for women.  Even as a senior executive, I knew when I needed to take a male partner with me to close the business deal, and even let them take the “lead” in the eyes of the client. 

      There has been behavioral evidence compiled over the past three decades that continues to suggest workplace gender bias not only persists but also thrives in ways many of us don’t even realize, particularly for women in male-dominated professions.

      You remember watching Anita Hill describe what it was like to be sexually harassed by her superior? We watched Hill’s testimony in front of an all-male Senate committee; we came to understand implicitly that this was what lay ahead of us in the work world.  It was clearly shocking at the time but has it really ever gone away?  

      So when I asked if sexism had affected women’s careers, many of my female colleagues shared stories of harassment, as though anything less than being openly ogled or physically groped didn’t count.  The most insidious kind of sexism is also the hardest to identify—the small “micro-aggressions” that are evident in the meetings and interactions that make up our workdays.  Some of the women I spoke to said they had encountered some kind of sexism in their career but the vast majority of them believed that it didn't directly impede their advancement—and all of them said they had expected to experience some sexism over the years.  Expected!  Think about that a moment 

      One of my friends and colleague in the TV business has her body scrutinized daily by her male boss, with remarks about her being a “hot Latina!” That same friend was passed over for a promotion in favor of a less-accomplished male colleague and then passed over a second time for no apparent reason.  She left the company and a culture that didn’t value her. Another friend of mine who is a lawyer and partner in a major law firm was told to “hold off pregnancy” for awhile, and another corporate colleague routinely was asked when she was “leaving to have babies.”  

      Overt workplace sexism may generate higher visibility, and the occasional harassment lawsuit, it’s the sexist jokes and comments around the office that can do real damage to a woman’s path to success. When a woman is labeled “tough, strong, decisive, or aggressive.” 

      I feel guilty admitting I was disappointed that these women who chose to leave the promotions they worked so hard to achieve, and then I thought: Even if you are qualified, maybe even are the smartest, best, and hardest-working employee at your company or within your department, why would you want to stay in an environment that doesn’t value you as a leader and employee. The upside is that these colleagues just didn’t accept sexism or condone the sexual harassment that is still the norm for far too many men in power today. 

      So, how do we fight sexism in the workplace?

      To their credit, some organizations try to combat workplace sexism through training programs and policies that favor gender equality in the workplace. But, the jury is still out on the long-term effectiveness of such initiatives.

      Francesca Gino, a Harvard Business School professor, conducted a survey finding that diversity sensitivity and training may be a good first step but, according to her research, “This awareness…can help people reflect on how to redesign processes so they more effectively counter biases. But others’ research shows that diversity training alone is ineffective in countering biases that taint decisions in organizations.”

      It is becoming more evident that sexism in the workplace is getting the attention of corporate America and top management and boards, particularly in more progressive organizations. But the move toward eradicating, or at least significantly reducing, gender bias in its most insidious form is slow. In the meantime, what can we women do to counter its effects on them?

      Of course, report egregious examples of workplace sexism to Human Resources and leadership. But, not all examples will rise to that level. When those are encountered, they should not go unaddressed either.

      At the very least, they can be treated as infantile remarks – the kind an 8 year-old nephew makes when he sees a nude photograph – with a rolling of the eyes and “really?” or “I can’t believe you just said” comment.

      When someone remarks that you or a female colleague is being “emotional,” you might remind him that your colleague is “passionate” about the subject, contrasting it with his rather passive interest…perhaps he should not be included among those working on the project, presentation or strategy development.

      One very effective way to call out someone making an offensive, sexist statement is to make him explain to those present what he means by it. 

      These are, of course short-term fixes at best. How can women both raise management consciousness and combat gender bias and sexism in the workplace?  There are at least two ways in which women can “fight back.”

      First, “e pluribus unum (out of many, one).” This is a collective way to support those on the receiving end of sexism, and to offer potential organizational ways to identify and combat it.

      By coming together, women can support each other and present a clear, unified voice to guide management in an unthreatening manner. It is a way to recognize sexism when you see it and formulate recommended corrective measures to management.

      But, it isn’t just a matter of coming together in a “bitching session.” It is a place to share experiences and formulate a way to identify sexist situations and present these examples to the organization…even present potential ways to address this challenge (have you read the book or seen the movie “Hidden Figures”?). 

      The second approach is an individual one that each woman has to develop for herself. 

      Keep in touch with colleagues from other organizations, even former classmates. And, don’t forget social media. Membership in LinkedIn groups and other forums will let you know you are not alone and may even provide insights into what other organizations are doing.  

      I have written before about, and strongly believe in the necessity of, finding a sponsor who can guide, critique, and help move a career in the right direction for leadership and career success.

      What both mentors and sponsors have to do with addressing workplace sexism cannot be underestimated and should be embraced as important mechanisms for both combatting this problem and moving a woman’s career ahead.

      What I find fascinating is that this current generation of women is feeling empowered to stand up and shout about sexism and gender bias.  But I can’t stop thinking just how much those women would have achieved if they hadn’t been told that their job “was always intended to be performed by a man”.  

      There is a reason Hidden Figures has been one of the top-grossing films and Academy Award nominee: beyond great performances, this is a story of empowerment, of black women overcoming the double barriers of race and gender. 

       The entire movie sends a clear message: when it comes to driving for success, neither skin color nor gender should matter. The only thing that can make a difference is performance, the great equalizer!

    • 02/23/2017 12:19 PM | Jan Molino (Administrator)

      Join us on March 9, 2017 for the season premiere of Aspire Ascend's Wine, Women, & Knowledge Networking Event celebrating National Women’s History month. This event will feature a dynamic panel led by three successful, accomplished women:

      Barbara McCormack, Vice President of Education at the Newseum, Suzanne Turner, CEO Turner4D an innovative public affairs firm, and Nicole Quiroga, General Manager Telemundo TV. They will lead the discussion on the state of women in leadership.

      Wine, Women & Knowledge is a valuable networking program that also provides opportunity to connect with other Aspire Ascend women who live or work in the Greater Washington metropolitan area– and enjoy some great wines and amazing hors d'oeuvres while you're at it.

      Join us to celebrate National Women's History month and the role women have played in the workforce as well as the path they paved for women in leadership today.

      -Tickets are limited. For more information, click here

    • 02/22/2017 12:07 PM | Jan Molino (Administrator)


      “If you think it’s hard to start a business, try it as a woman!”

      While women are a growing force in American entrepreneurship, they still face daunting obstacles to success, many unique to women. Once considered a man’s domain the tide has shifted: more than 9 million U.S. firms are now owned by women, employing nearly 8 million people and generating $1.8+ trillion in sales, according to 2016 data from the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO).

      Think about these numbers for a moment.  Yet in spite of these impressive numbers, women often face unique challenges not typically shared by their male counterparts.  Issues such as: sex discrimination in lending or attracting investors, juggling the demands of running both a business and a household; lack of equal opportunities in certain industries; and many times the lack of a support network.

      Most women I have counseled who want to begin their own business look first to their own savings to fund that enterprise. Men tend to look for investors or other forms of “external” funding.

      Why don’t women begin the search for capital by looking beyond their own checkbooks?

      The response I most frequently hear is that they don’t go to outside sources because they believe a woman will be turned down or not be taken seriously by the (mostly) men who are making the funding decisions. That feeling is also shared by members of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) who, in a recent survey, said the first place its members look for business capital is their personal savings. They believe they will be denied credit or other funding access because of their gender.

      Here’s a tip that may help you find funding. Look for funding where you may already have a network you’re not aware of. For instance, check the alumni directory of your college (or other directory of an organization you belong to). Is there someone there who can open a door for you or, better yet, is in the business of funding start-ups?   

      Some women entrepreneurs I’ve coached and worked with exhibit the “superwoman syndrome.” They try to do it all.  I’ve worked with a few of these “superwomen”, and some of them can actually pull off that high-wire act. …..for a while.

      Then something gives.

      A friend of mine, a senior-level executive at a major technology firm, was on the “superwoman” track…very successful in business with an equally successful husband. The couple made a joint decision to not have children. Instead they poured their passion into their careers.

      Highly regarded in her field and travelling around the world, she and her husband met the highest-level executives and government leaders. They attended and hosted the best events. When they were in the same town at the same time, they even attended them together!

      The stress of staying on that treadmill finally got to her…most likely to both of them. They’re now divorced. When I see her, she is unhappy and filled with self-doubt.

      The sad truth is. No one can be all things to all people in their lives and do it all successfully. That doesn’t make you a top performer in all or maybe any of your roles. So don’t try. It doesn’t make you a successful business owner (or executive). The fact is, trying to do it all only increases your stress level and affects your health.

      Although the number of women business owners is growing, there aren’t enough of them to serve as role models and business mentors for other women with the same aspirations. This lack of a business advisor or mentoring network is a big difference between male and female entrepreneurs.

      Inc. Magazine reports that 48% of women founders report that a lack of available advisors and mentors limits their professional growth.

      The woman who aspires to own her own business must seek out mentors and role models with whom to build relationships and get guidance. So, where does a businesswoman look?

      Social media is a good place to begin. There are a growing number of online “communities” that offer guidance, opportunities to build networks, even potential funding sources. And, of course, they can be an excellent source of inspirational success stories to model.

      Find other women with the same aspirations and facing the same issues. Join professional associations and make the time to attend professional networking functions for senior-level women and entrepreneurs. Building that strong business will help you through the inevitable tough times.

      According to Babson College’s 2012 Global Entrepreneur Monitor, fear of failure is at the top of the list of women who start businesses. But – here come those role models – you will find that most successful entrepreneurs (and this goes for men as well as women) have failed it least once, and probably numerous times before they achieve success. Ask any successful entrepreneur and they will tell you about their failures and how it made them what they are today

      You will make mistakes. We all do. Yes, I make mistakes as well.  The real question is how you will respond. Learning from the mistake, making the course correction and moving on is a good deal healthier and more productive than beating yourself up and letting self-doubt begin to occupy your thinking.

      Stay healthy. Try to build a routine that balances work with appropriate exercise nutrition and sleep and interaction with others in your life not directly involved in your business.

      And, remember: building a business is a marathon, not a sprint. Set reasonable and achievable expectations for yourself and your funders. Put measurements in place to see how you’re doing and don’t be afraid to make the necessary adjustments if you begin to stray off course. And try to remember the reason you wanted to run your own business in the first place.

      So, build a network you can depend on for ideas, guidance and support; stay focused and positive; make a healthy lifestyle a priority.

      All of this will help you build and sustain the confidence, contacts and collateral needed to ride the entrepreneurial experience to a successful business.

    • 01/26/2017 2:03 PM | Jan Molino (Administrator)


      Join us on February 22, 2017 for the season premiere of Aspire Ascend's Remarkable Woman program and get up close and personal with Nancy Roman, President & CEO of the Capital Area Food Bank. The series is designed to profile a “remarkable woman” who has achieved success, influenced others or left an indelible mark on society for other women.

      Nancy Roman, who is one of the 2016 "Women Who Mean Business" honorees, has had an international career that has spanned journalism, business, U.S. government, Wall Street and the United Nations-- all of which has prepared her for the Food Bank. Her most recent past position was on the leadership team of the United Nations’ World Food Programme. During her time there, Nancy helped create flagship partnerships with Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Kraft Foods and many others. Bringing that entrepreneurial spirit to the Food Bank, Nancy has continued to build public and private partnerships since she became CEO in 2013.

      This is a truly remarkable opportunity to meet this accomplished woman executive who is making a difference for over half a million people each year in the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area.

      -Tickets are limited. For more information, click here


    • 01/23/2017 11:13 AM | Jan Molino (Administrator)


      "Stress, Your Business Partner"

      My recently posted story in Thrive Global

      You finally made it to the c-suite. It’s the job you’ve been seeking your entire career. It gives you the authority to get things done, it’s validation that you are making a difference, it rewards your belief in your values, and it is awfully nice to have the perquisites that go with the office.

      But, there are other, negative, perks that seem to come with the territory as well.

      The workload you felt at times was crushing on the way to the c-suite has increased now that you’ve arrived. There is no “honeymoon period!” The little time you thought you had before is now completely gone. And, the political minefields you carefully had to navigate on the journey to the corner office now extend over the horizon.

      A lot is riding on your shoulders. Mistakes are now magnified with consequences far greater for the organization and they touch more careers than before.

      Waiting for you in your new c-suite office among the congratulatory messages and bouquets is another “gift.” STRESS. Welcome to the CEO suite and the loneliest job in the business!

      There is no c-suite “owners’ manual,” but there are things you can do to recognize and deal with the additional stress executive leaders experience. And, make no mistake, that stress is heightened if you are a woman. Stress can take a tremendous toll and lead to illness, depression and, in extreme cases even lead to suicide

      Many female CEOs experience stressful work situations because of a constant sense of having their confidence undermined by men and are put in situations where they have to continuously prove themselves in the workplace. Women have also taken on more responsibilities at work while also retaining their responsibilities at home. That doubling of things on women’s plates is a huge stress accelerator.

      Whether your stress is due to daily organizational or financial matters, communications challenges, time-management and c-suite obligations, or work-life balance issues, identifying and addressing it (or them) will help you successfully get through the day, meet your obligations and maintain your health — mental and physical.

      Stress and its partner, burn out, do not occur overnight and their warning signs can be subtle, so you have to be self-aware and pay close attention to potential “red flags.”

      Here are a few things you can check that will help you identify your level of stress and whether you are burning out.

      • Do you have difficulty sleeping
      • Are you impatient or unusually irritable
      • Have you increased your use of alcohol or other substances
      • Is your productivity declining
      • Are you getting ill more frequently
      • Are you easily angered
      • Do you fixate on problems and are easily worried about them
      • Has your energy level diminished or do you feel emotionally or physically “exhausted”
      • Do you lack interest in usually pleasurable activities
      Many executive leaders feel isolated. The isolation of the c-suite can create or exacerbate many symptoms of stress and/or burnout.

      It is not difficult to understand why leaders can feel isolated. There are few people they can trust to “speak truth to power.” It generally is not someone in their organization or on their management team, who might believe his/her career progression could be affected by such action. But, finding someone with whom you can speak honestly and who will provide honest feedback — a former c-suite executive who has worked in a similar organization or who sits on a comparable board, or an executive coach, is important in combatting isolation.

      There are also some practical things we all can do to relieve stress and defeat burnout.

      Face it head on. “If the source of the stress is something that’s being ignored, deal with directly, “ says Amazon’s Jeff Bezos. Stress primarily comes from not taking action over something that you can have some control over. As soon as you can identify it and do whatever it is that you are going to do to start to address that situation (make the phone call or send off an e-mail) — even if it’s not solved — the fact that you’re addressing it dramatically reduces some of the stress that might come from it.

      Find A Quiet Place. When you are feeling overwhelmed, go to a quiet place… some corporations now have “meditation” rooms and if all else fails, maybe a bathroom. You’re the CEO; you have your own bathroom. Hey, it works for Oprah!

      Take a Break and Move Away From the Desk. Sometimes, stepping away and taking a break is the best strategy. You just might see things differently and in a new light…and you just might come away with new insights.

      Get Your Sleep. I can’t tell you enough how sleep or the lack of sleep can make a difference in your day! Sleep and productivity are linked and you need to make it a priority.

      Create a list of priorities and plan ahead. Identify the most important things you have to accomplish in a given day and focus your activities on those priorities.

      Promote Open Communications. Make sure you’re engaging in a dialog with your employees; facilitate flexibility in workplace policies so your people don’t burn out. It’s bad for your company, and just plain bad for everyone!

      Delegate. You do not have to do everything yourself. Delegating is also a way you can identify future organizational leaders and maybe come up with new ways to meet old challenges.

      Be mindful of work-life balance. Carve out time away from work to maintain that balance. If you don’t have a management team that can support an occasional time out for you, you may have other organizational issues to address.

      Build in time to exercise. Give stress physical release or find other ways to maintain your health and diminish stress. Walk to meetings instead of taking an elevator, take a few “power naps” during the day or find something else that works for you.

      Understand that every business — and every life — has its ups and downs, its good days and bad. But that doesn’t mean it gets to take over your life. When handled correctly, stress can be contained, minimized and conquered.

      By better managing the daily c-suite stresses, you will become more productive, build better relationships, balance work and life, and become a better leader. It might also help you enjoy life more.




    • 01/16/2017 10:13 AM | Jan Molino (Administrator)


      We all know those women — the ones who stride with an air of grace into a room. They’re not always the prettiest or smartest. They’re not arrogant. They’re the ones who make you want to be around them.

      But not everyone is comfortable walking into a room with that kind of confidence. So many of us walk straight toward people we already know.  If we walk up to two people talking, we generally stand there and wait for them to notice us.  Or even worse, you go to an event and instead of meeting people, you pull out your phone and studiously check email as if you are too important to meet people.

      You know what's interesting?  When you are with friends, I will bet you have the BEST stories.  But if you meet a group of people you don’t know, suddenly you have nothing to say.  Most people just think “that’s how it goes,” but you can actually treat this as a skill and improve it.

      Here is some sage advice to “get our from behind the potted plant” from Aspire Ascend’s communication and public speaking coach, Jan Fox

      Your boss invites you to a high-end networking event in NYC. He suddenly gets called away.  You are told to, “Handle it!” A young friend of mine recently faced this situation. Petrified, she says she spent most of the evening hiding behind a big potted plant. 

      No connections made that night!   How many times have you gone into a networking event feeling less than secure, wishing you could find the proverbial plant? You try:

      • • Hanging out at the bar
      • • Talking to your friend the whole time 
      • • Flitting from guest to guest – looking above their heads

      Want to get out of plant land? 

      • • Come loaded with good questions to ask.
      • • Walk slowly toward the most talkative, laughing group. 
      • • Make eye contact with someone in the group. 

      You will be invited in, so offer a handshake. Here comes the most often asked question at every networking event, “What do you do?”

      “Get out of the elevator!” Throw away that canned pitch. They all sound alike these days.  “I drive results and help you reach your fullest potential,” says nothing about who you are and what you do. 

      Start with your end user. Who uses what you do most? 

      Instead of rattling off her long title at a top consulting firm, Sandra asked the group a question: “Do you ever ride AMTRAK? Notice how the conductors now use a hand held scanner to check your ticket? It’s a lot faster and more accurate. I work with ABC - the company that developed that technology. Now we’re working on an app for soldiers on the battlefield. They can call it up to find tips to fight fatigue.” 

      Imagine the questions and conversations that kind of tangible, visual answer will generate! 

      Who are your end users? What do you do for them? What’s the next offering in the pipeline – the one that sparks your passion? 

      Let it show as you talk about it. 

      Start there.  You won’t end up behind the potted plant ever again! 

      Some great advice, right?  But you also need to be your authentic self---no more, no less.  Some other suggestions to help you be confident are to stop taking everything personally.   Do you know any confident woman who takes everything personally? Those with true confidence know that any perceived ego blow is more a reflection of the speaker than of them.

      When you’re able to hear criticism and not take it personally, your reactions change.  Life isn’t as much of a drama. Confidence emerges naturally with life.

      And finally, ask empowering questions.   What is an empowering question?  It is one that cannot be answered with a simple “yes” or “no” answer.  It requires the person to gather their thoughts and explain them with some level of detail.   How do you know if your question is empowering? One hint is the first word used in asking the question.  If your question begins with the words, “What”, “Why”, “Where” “Who” or “How”, it is an empowering question.  A great question: “Why did this work?”

      Simply, the more empowering questions we ask, the more confidant we will become.   When empowering questions become second nature, you have no choice but to find confidence-inducing answers.  And that is a sure pathway out from behind that potted plant!






    • 12/13/2016 3:04 PM | Jan Molino (Administrator)


      Did you know that one crucial difference between how women and men manage their careers is how they form professional networks?

      Men's networks are widely dispersed while women tend to form their professional networks in the same ways they form their personal ones -- based on trust and first-degree knowledge. Women tend to stay in their comfort zones with old friends, former colleagues, and “safe” networks where many of us know one another. This insular approach can actually stop women from reaching beyond the people they already know, reducing the effectiveness of their networks by excluding people who could become a positive influence on their professional lives.

      But savvy women executives are learning from their male counterparts and replicating the nuances of male networking that have proven successful, taking time to meet and engage new people!

      So let’s learn some of the networking rules of engagement that will yield better results and help us gain more meaningful and tangential connections.

      • Look up from your daily responsibilities to take advantage of formal networks set up on your behalf. How many of you shake off going to new events -- too busy," "I don’t know anyone," and "I can’t leave the office”?
      • Networks are most useful when they’re large and involve many people who don’t know one another; a new business opportunity is more likely to come from a loosely defined connection than a long-term, tight connection. 
      • On a regular basis, deepen a connection with someone and add a new person to your network. Those people should be at all levels, both junior and senior to you. Ignore the old rules that say only people above you in the corporate hierarchy can be useful.

      Yes, the old model of networking for short-term gain -- to help you find that next job -- can yield immediate financial returns, but the new rules will pay off in the long run. Instead of leveraging people for your own gain, start to learn from them and make more meaningful gains from these connections. 

      What more women are realizing is that formal networking is critical to their success. While these types of formal networks are taking hold in several fields, including medicine and science, women executives are often too busy to take advantage of them. Oftentimes women are so focused on succeeding in their current jobs and getting their jobs done well, they may not think about attending an event or make these a priority.

      So say “yes” to salons and other organized networking events that will introduce interesting people to one another. Use your network to learn new things. Share interesting knowledge, and you will make deeper connections rather than just adding people to your network.

      I know digital networking groups are important, but don’t assume you are networking just because you are on LinkedIn.

      A great networker is someone who helps people connect with others! Invest in building a deeper network by developing a reputation as a person who has something to offer others. 

       “It’s not just about who I know, it’s about what I know.”

      And that is why I founded Aspire Ascend, so women executives have the space not only to support each other but also the ability to expand their networks and enhance their professional and personal lives.

      Take a look at the photos from our most recent networking event, Wine, Women, and Knowledge, held November 16, 2017!

    • 11/11/2016 10:23 AM | Jan Molino (Administrator)


      Yes, it is a glass ceiling with some cracks, but it is not shattered!  The business world has not yet embraced women and diversity in the C-suite, nor in the boardroom, nor in any industry to date. Twenty years later, we are still explaining the persistence of that glass ceiling.

      Nationally, in the boardroom female representation is 17.9%.  In Maryland, Virginia, and the District, women hold 14% of the board positions at publicly traded companies.  When you look at these boards, you will see a cadre of retired male executives.  According to Women in Technology, a nonprofit group in Falls Church, VA, 25% of the 250 publicly traded companies in the DC region do not have women on their boards.

      Changing the status quo is still a very slow process.  That glass ceiling is a barrier so “subtle that it is transparent, yet so strong that it prevents women from moving up the corporate hierarchy”.  From their vantage point on the corporate ladder, women can see the high-level corporate positions but are kept from reaching the top.

      As for the boardroom, corporate boards do not have term limits or age restrictions, which mean members often remain in board positions for years, if not decades.  And when a spot does open up, executives generally fill it with their peers, who just happen to be white males.   In the C-suite, as well as in the boardroom, the number-one limiting belief is that they don’t know (or recognize) many women who are qualified or board-ready, or who are perceived as “leaders” in the C-suite.   

      But they’re out there. You just don’t – or won’t – see them.  

      Women’s abilities are more harshly judged than men. Holding women to  higher standards and evaluating female leaders and prospective board members more critically than their male counterparts is common practice.

      While overt discrimination seems to be on the way out of organizations, subtle gender discrimination still exists and accounts for so few significant cracks in the glass ceiling.  Such discrimination, mostly exemplified in cultural norms, is so entrenched in some organizations that it is difficult to detect, and only incremental steps aimed at changing bias can chip away at the barriers that keep women from moving into senior levels and the boardroom.

      Companies that succeed in changing the gender dynamic have major initiatives such as training programs for valuing gender diversity; changing recruiting patterns to eliminate bias, and setting specific succession goals that include women in senior positions.  In other words, these companies walk their talk and make gender diversity part of their culture all the way into the boardroom. 

      If we are to see significant changes within leadership, organizations must create and implement executive development programs that include issues addressing gender diversity and transformational leadership in order to change preconceived ideas, bias, and assumptions about women’s abilities to lead.  

      And then, just maybe that glass ceiling will be shattered!











    • 11/01/2016 7:52 AM | Jan Molino (Administrator)


      Last week, my firm, Aspire Ascend, held its first in a series of Remarkable Woman Luncheons. Our first speaker was Susan Ann Davis, a “remarkable woman” with an inspirational story and a speaking style that draws you in….and we couldn’t have asked for anyone better to initiate this series. 

      Susan is a pioneer who opened her own public relations agency when few women were experiencing success in the business world, and fewer still owned their own businesses. It has grown into a global organization with major international clients, and Susan has ¬¬emerged as one of the most influential people (man or woman) in her field. 

      Among the sold-out audience were senior-level executives, an ambassador, a congresswoman, and entrepreneurs -- all remarkable women themselves. They came to hear Susan share her story, and she came because she lives the philosophy that women help women. 

      Every attendee agreed that Susan was engaging, funny, and down-to-earth as well as remaining an entrepreneur of global business. But her message was serious: believe in yourself, build a support network, and don’t be afraid to take a chance. I like those words!

      These are great guidelines for all women, but they are particularly important for those of us who are already in leadership.

      At a time when we may very well see the first woman President of the United States, we still hear stories of accomplished, well-qualified women being passed over for positions or promotions even when they have the same experience and qualifications as men. And, when women make it to the c-suite, build a successful enterprise, or are elected to office, they are held to a different -- and often ridiculously higher -- standard than men. 

      Susan has lived through all of it in her rise to the top, and she shared her story -- no, make that stories -- with the group. Her anecdotes were both cheerful and tearful, and I saw many in the room taking notes from this true role model.

      The diversity of women in the room confirmed my long-held belief that one of the most important elements of any network (but especially women’s networks) is diversity. We put limits on both our network and what we can learn from them if we don’t make our “circle of influence” as wide as possible. 

      One of the themes I heard, both in Susan’s comments and in the numerous conversations among attendees, was the importance (and I’m paraphrasing here) of “doing less and networking more.” To me, it’s the difference between meeting short-term goals or building a career…and taking the reins of leadership in whatever endeavor you pursue.

      This message resonated with me since I frequently find myself advising clients to “keep their heads up” and build relationships instead of “keeping their heads down” and passing up on the events and programs where you can meet more “influencers.” That will help you find new avenues for business success, career advancement, and greater self-fulfillment. 

      I was pleased to see that women who had just met were making plans to follow up and meet again, and exchanging business cards, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses as they left the luncheon together. 

      One attendee told me as she was leaving, “It was great to meet other successful and enthusiastic women. We spend so much time working on business objectives, we don’t often get the chance to work on our own objectives.” 

      It’s good for women -- at whatever stage of their careers -- to hear from other women who are willing to share their stories. We learn that no dream is too big and that support is there when you ask for it. That’s the ultimate message…. And that’s why I’m proud that Aspire Ascend will continue to provide membership and a forum for discussion and support -- where women support other women! 

      Take a look at the photos from the Remarkable Woman lunch here

      Aspire Ascend is a global service provider and a member-based organization providing a comprehensive portfolio of career-building services to enhance the success of women in leadership positions. It helps executive women meet the challenges of career advancement and make an impact in the C-suite.










    • 09/15/2016 4:54 PM | Jan Molino (Administrator)

      Washington, DC, September 15, 2016 – “Women are underrepresented at every level of the corporate pipeline, with the greatest disparity at senior levels of leadership,” according to Jan Molino, CEO and Managing Partner of Aspire Ascend. In Filling the Leadership Pipeline with Women, a free e-book just published by the firm, she offers senior women in the workplace common-sense ways to take charge of their careers in what continues to be a male-dominated environment. 

      The e-book advises women on how to help themselves and their organizations’ with strategies for gender equity in the workplace. 

      Ms. Molino shares the knowledge gained over more than 20 years as a senior executive and counselor to c-suites and both corporate and non-profit boards. She has worked with numerous executive women, counseling them on how to cross the threshold into the c-suite, and she shares that knowledge and experience with readers. 

      "When we make the corporate ladder more accessible to women, we incorporate fresh thinking, new perspectives and a more inclusive outlook into an organization’s culture,” says Molino.

      The book also shines a light on the need for organizations to recognize that true gender equity – not just lip service – is needed for women to rise into the leadership ranks. Ms. Molino suggests ways in which organizations can build cultures that encourage, support, and recognize the success of women as they take on greater responsibilities and move toward leadership positions.

      “Organizations need to build conviction that what is good for women will be good for men, as well as for the entire enterprise,” says Molino.

      The free e-book, “Filling the Leadership Pipelines with Women,” is available to download here.

       Aspire Ascend is a global service provider and a member-based organization providing a comprehensive portfolio of career building services to enhance the success of women in leadership positions.  It helps executive women meet the challenges of career advancement and make an impact in the C-suite.

      www.aaspire-ascend.com




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